Commutes: MTA Series

This project, like the NJ Transit series, is inspired by the routine observations, encounters and experiences I undergo as I utilize public transportation systems to commute from home to work and back. Both projects are concerned with the tension between personal and public notions of routes, maps and landmarks. They share common themes, however each project was developed in relation to a specific context, a unique set of circumstances.

The MTA series is enacted along a different leg of my journey, the New York Metropolitan Transit Authority subway system, in particular the busy 42nd Street Times Square station where I transfer from train to bus. As I pass along the station’s corridors I have noticed a curious hole in the low ceiling. This peculiar aperture became a landmark for me. It seemed to have no obvious function, so, I invented one for it. First, I visited the site to measure the distance between my body and this enigmatic architectural feature. Then, I constructed a simple wooden attachë based on the measurements I had taken at the site. Now, when I commute, I carry my attachë. When I reach the site, I put the case down beneath the hole and step up on it, inserting my body into the space between the attachë case and the ceiling with my head in the depth of the hole. I pause here for a few moments, allowing this landmark a place on my personal itinerary, and then I move on. . .